A storm’s a-brewin’ (and we’re all in the same ‘boue’)

Warning: this one gets a little messy.

The Congo adventure continues…

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A storm’s a-brewin’

When I first arrived, DRC was in the thick of its dry season. Just looking over the fields would elicit thirst-  a dull brown backdrop of cultivated plots with little to offer but dried out crops scorched by the relentless sun.

Tragically, deforestation has rendered the ‘forest’ a sparse collection of trees, most of which have acquiesced to the parched color du jour, extinguishing any thought of moisture.

And then the rains came.

Almost daily, around three in the afternoon, dark, ominous clouds start to roll in, a deceptive calm awaiting their arrival. Everything is still, just a light breeze dancing in the trees, slowly gaining momentum that elicits long, languid backbends from the palm branches towering above.

Soon, an eerie darkness settles in. In a matter of seconds, the clouds unleash with a ferocity I’ve never experienced. A barrage of raindrops pummels the roof, drowning out all other sounds…until the lightning joins in. The entire sky lights up while I hold my breath, waiting for the thunder to come crashing down. It’s as exhilarating as it is terrifying. But the reward is worth the terror.

The parched landscape has transformed into a decadent patchwork of emerald, lime, and avocado greens. There is still brown, however. Only now, it’s a rich chocolate brown that covers everything.

And there is no escaping it.

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La Boue (mud)

The dust that used to make its way into every possible crack and crevice has been replaced with a pasty, relentless, dark clay that consumes most of my day. I am either trying to maneuver my way through it without slipping or searching for any available surface to scrape it off my shoes, only to step right back in it. When I finally reach safe grounds, I have to deal with the dried up remnants trailing behind me- in my office, my house, my sheets. Chunks of mud are forever finding their way into my socks, shoes, drawers, books…a bit more intrusive than its dusty counterpart.

This seasonal intruder doesn’t appear to relent to experience or adaptation: local farmers on their way to the fields, women on their way to church, children on their way to school. Even the goats roaming about tread lightly.

We are all its victims, taking every opportunity to scrape it off the souls of our shoes. Some continue on, letting the layers build up. Others give up and carry on barefoot. But no one escapes its unmerciful grasp…and it seems we are all in the same ‘boue’.

You can support all the work the sanctuary does to protect these amazing souls by donating here.

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9 thoughts on “A storm’s a-brewin’ (and we’re all in the same ‘boue’)

  1. “…that dances in the trees, inspiring long, languid backbends from the palm branches and a gentle rustling of the leaves.”

    I wonder sometimes if I slowed down enough, would I be able to write like this? I think in order to write such lovely things you have to be 100% present in the task. Is it like that for you?
    Lovely, my dear. Lovely.

    Like

    • you just gave me goose bumps. So funny, because I doubt every word that I write, is it too this or that? I do think the ‘slowing down’ part is essential. I get so wrapped in the craziness of life that I don’t take the time to observe the moment, reflect on how to record the moments. I also think reading a lot of books you normally would not helps..I seriously read so much that I almost feel like a character sometimes, or I start to think of other people as characters and how I would describe them…kind of funny.
      Thanks for the kind words, Bec..truly means more than you know!

      Like

  2. I will say it over and over again, I love these posts! You immerse me in the experiences, and the elements (in this case the mud) and the senses, become characters. Wonderful writing, Brooke!!!!!! Thank you for sharing your adventures!

    Liked by 1 person

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